Quote
"For we are capable of doing only what we are inclined to do. And again, we truly incline only toward something that in turn inclines toward us, toward our essential being, by appealing to our essential being as the keeper who holds us in our essential being. What keeps us in our essential nature holds us only so long, however, as we for our part keep holding on to what holds us. And we keep holding on to it by not letting it out of our memory. Memory is the gathering of thought."

— Martin Heidegger, What is Called Thinking?

(Source: philoskaisophos, via thoughtsandqueries)

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In Hope of Resurrection, 2014

In Hope of Resurrection, 2014

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markmcevoy:

Bartleby
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wilwheaton:


[I]f the Republicans want to spend the entire next six months or year talking about repealing a bill that provides millions of people health insurance without providing any meaningful alternative, instead of wanting to talk about jobs and the economic situation of families all across the country, that’s their prerogative. At some point I think they’ll make the transition. That’s my hope, anyway. If not, we’re just going to keep on doing what we’re doing, which is making it work for people all across the country.
I’m sorry, I’m going to say one last thing about this, just because this does frustrate me: States that have chosen not to expand Medicaid for no other reason than political spite. You’ve got 5 million people who could be having health insurance right now at no cost to these states—zero cost to these states—other than ideological reasons. They have chosen not to provide health insurance for their citizens. That’s wrong. It should stop. Those folks should be able to get health insurance like everybody else.
- President Obama

Most of the states with Republican governors who have opted out of the Medicaid expansion have very poor people living there, too. These governors are deliberately hurting their own citizens because they don’t like the president. That’s just wrong.

wilwheaton:

[I]f the Republicans want to spend the entire next six months or year talking about repealing a bill that provides millions of people health insurance without providing any meaningful alternative, instead of wanting to talk about jobs and the economic situation of families all across the country, that’s their prerogative. At some point I think they’ll make the transition. That’s my hope, anyway. If not, we’re just going to keep on doing what we’re doing, which is making it work for people all across the country.

I’m sorry, I’m going to say one last thing about this, just because this does frustrate me: States that have chosen not to expand Medicaid for no other reason than political spite. You’ve got 5 million people who could be having health insurance right now at no cost to these states—zero cost to these states—other than ideological reasons. They have chosen not to provide health insurance for their citizens. That’s wrong. It should stop. Those folks should be able to get health insurance like everybody else.

- President Obama

Most of the states with Republican governors who have opted out of the Medicaid expansion have very poor people living there, too. These governors are deliberately hurting their own citizens because they don’t like the president. That’s just wrong.

(Source: dailykos.com)

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theparisreview:

Toward the end of the session, Josef Breitenbach asked James Joyce if there were some special pose or gesture that he would wish recorded. Joyce thought for a moment, and raised his hand to his forehead. Then he let the hand pass over his eyes, covering them. When the hand cradled his nose and chin, Joyce indicated that this was the pose, and Breitenbach pressed the shutter.
From the portfolio “Ten Portraits” in our Winter 1983 issue.

theparisreview:

Toward the end of the session, Josef Breitenbach asked James Joyce if there were some special pose or gesture that he would wish recorded. Joyce thought for a moment, and raised his hand to his forehead. Then he let the hand pass over his eyes, covering them. When the hand cradled his nose and chin, Joyce indicated that this was the pose, and Breitenbach pressed the shutter.

From the portfolio “Ten Portraits” in our Winter 1983 issue.

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nevver:

The Nietzsche Family Circus
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"He allowed himself to be swayed by his conviction that human beings are not born once and for all on the day their mothers give birth to them, but that life obliges them over and over again to give birth to themselves."

— Gabriel Garcí­a Márquez, Love in the Time of Cholera

(Source: thebookkook)

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In Sickness & In Health: A Couple’s Final Journey - Sun Sentinel:



Chris MacLellan and Bernard Richard Schiffer never exchanged “for better or for worse” vows.
As a gay couple, marriage wasn’t an option in Florida. Instead, they lived together and loved each other for 11 years.
They met at a senior singles party in Fort Lauderdale and were immediately drawn to each other. Differences in age, personality and upbringing did not matter.
Before long, Chris moved into Richard’s house. They repainted the walls, made new friends and met each other’s old ones. A photo in their Deerfield Beach home shows them smiling and elegantly dressed for a formal night on a trans-Atlantic cruise. Both wore tuxedos and bow ties.
Richard, who previously had survived two coronary bypasses and prostate cancer, was diagnosed with esophageal cancer in 2011. By September 2013, the tumors had spread to his spine.
Together, Chris and Richard confronted the challenges of being an older gay couple not recognized by law, navigating a system they feared could rob them of their ability to care for each other in sickness and in health. After all, legal rights regarding death are intricately entwined with the privileges granted when people marry.

In Sickness & In Health: A Couple’s Final Journey - Sun Sentinel:

Chris MacLellan and Bernard Richard Schiffer never exchanged “for better or for worse” vows.

As a gay couple, marriage wasn’t an option in Florida. Instead, they lived together and loved each other for 11 years.

They met at a senior singles party in Fort Lauderdale and were immediately drawn to each other. Differences in age, personality and upbringing did not matter.

Before long, Chris moved into Richard’s house. They repainted the walls, made new friends and met each other’s old ones. A photo in their Deerfield Beach home shows them smiling and elegantly dressed for a formal night on a trans-Atlantic cruise. Both wore tuxedos and bow ties.

Richard, who previously had survived two coronary bypasses and prostate cancer, was diagnosed with esophageal cancer in 2011. By September 2013, the tumors had spread to his spine.

Together, Chris and Richard confronted the challenges of being an older gay couple not recognized by law, navigating a system they feared could rob them of their ability to care for each other in sickness and in health. After all, legal rights regarding death are intricately entwined with the privileges granted when people marry.

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(via piecomic)

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“Although a magnet for tourists from all over the world, Budapest has for several years been known to its own people as The City of Suicides. Budapest suffered badly after the war and has received unpleasant publicity from the number of cases of self destruction occurring every year within its boundaries. Now, however, a “Smile Club” has been inaugurated to counteract the suicide craze. lt was originally begun more as a Joke by a Professor Jeno and a hypnotist named Binczo, but somehow it caught on. The organisers have now a regular school and guarantee to teach the Roosevelt smile, the Mona Lisa smile, the Clark Gable smile, the Dick Powell smile, the Loretta Young smile, and various other types, the rates varying according to the difficulties encountered.” (via Smile School Budapest | Retronaut)

“Although a magnet for tourists from all over the world, Budapest has for several years been known to its own people as The City of Suicides. Budapest suffered badly after the war and has received unpleasant publicity from the number of cases of self destruction occurring every year within its boundaries. Now, however, a “Smile Club” has been inaugurated to counteract the suicide craze. lt was originally begun more as a Joke by a Professor Jeno and a hypnotist named Binczo, but somehow it caught on. The organisers have now a regular school and guarantee to teach the Roosevelt smile, the Mona Lisa smile, the Clark Gable smile, the Dick Powell smile, the Loretta Young smile, and various other types, the rates varying according to the difficulties encountered.” (via Smile School Budapest | Retronaut)