Quote
"We are made of memories and formed by experience. I keep wondering what kind of people we would be, and what kind of world this would be, if when bad things happened we could erase them, or somehow make them sweet."

Sue Halpern considers the implications of MIT’s research into “taking the sting out of bad memories by switching the bad ones with good ones.” Also see neurologist Oliver Sacks on the complexities of memory. (via explore-blog)

Photoset

austinkleon:

Original pre-Photoshop assemblages Dave McKean made for The Sandman covers

neil-gaiman:

poisonousliasons:

Before Photoshop

I miss them still…

They really were that size: paintings and assemblages that Dave would take to get photographed, and send the transparency to DC Comics to use as a cover.

Here’s McKean:

Some covers were painted, some drawn, but many of the first few were 5ft-high collage-type works made by me that we took to a high-res photography studio to shoot – this was all pre-computers. I ended up wandering around London with Neil trying to find interesting bits and bobs to use as imagery. We liberated a fantastic-looking broken door from a skip, and found odds and ends in antique shops. People started donating things: I did a signing in London and someone gave me a lamb’s heart in a block of resin. It got used a few times.

Still my favorite graphic novel, and McKean’s work was no small part of the reason why.

Quote
"I shall continue to exist. I may assume other disguises, other forms, but I shall try to exist."

Vladimir Nabokov, Pale Fire

(via fuckyeahexistentialism)

Photo
Hearing voices allowed Charles Dickens to create extraordinary fictional worlds | Books | theguardian.com:

Evelyn Waugh’s A Handful of Dust (1934) ends with its protagonist, Tony Last, trapped in the Brazilian jungle by his captor, Mr Todd, who compels him to read aloud the complete works of Charles Dickens, in sequence, over and over, without end – or escape. It’s a fantastically dark conceit: the great Victorian novelist as the sadist’s accomplice. It also links Dickens to the possibility that there is something potentially oppressive, even imprisoning, in experiencing the human voice. Voices, it suggests, may tyrannise the mind. […]
Most modern readers may feel instinctively that literary experience has much in common with the act of overhearing. Reading fiction is a process of allowing characters’ voices to sound in the inner ear, and absorbing the imagined noise they make (magically cued by curls of ink on a page). It’s common to think of writers, too, building fictional worlds through voices, as if creativity begins as a subtle internal overhearing. The analogy between imagining and hearing certainly runs deep in our myths of culture. Inspiration, that theory of composition at once ancient, Romantic, and modern, tells us that creativity ignites by admitting some mysterious other voice into the writer’s flow of being. To write means having one’s voice disrupted, taken over, rendered by another. Dickens believed this, too.

(via my mom)

Hearing voices allowed Charles Dickens to create extraordinary fictional worlds | Books | theguardian.com:

Evelyn Waugh’s A Handful of Dust (1934) ends with its protagonist, Tony Last, trapped in the Brazilian jungle by his captor, Mr Todd, who compels him to read aloud the complete works of Charles Dickens, in sequence, over and over, without end – or escape. It’s a fantastically dark conceit: the great Victorian novelist as the sadist’s accomplice. It also links Dickens to the possibility that there is something potentially oppressive, even imprisoning, in experiencing the human voice. Voices, it suggests, may tyrannise the mind. […]

Most modern readers may feel instinctively that literary experience has much in common with the act of overhearing. Reading fiction is a process of allowing characters’ voices to sound in the inner ear, and absorbing the imagined noise they make (magically cued by curls of ink on a page). It’s common to think of writers, too, building fictional worlds through voices, as if creativity begins as a subtle internal overhearing. The analogy between imagining and hearing certainly runs deep in our myths of culture. Inspiration, that theory of composition at once ancient, Romantic, and modern, tells us that creativity ignites by admitting some mysterious other voice into the writer’s flow of being. To write means having one’s voice disrupted, taken over, rendered by another. Dickens believed this, too.

(via my mom)

Quote
"Perhaps it is true that we do not really exist until there is someone there to see us existing, we cannot properly speak until there is someone who can understand what we are saying in essence, we are not wholly alive until we are loved."

— Alain de Botton, On Love (via quotethat)

(via theintentionallife)

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nevver:

Goethe
Photo

(Source: electricarc, via xkot)

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"But breaking was beautiful. It hurt, and it was an uphill climb back to sanity, but you came back stronger, fiercer, and more solid than you were before."

— Penelope Davis, Rival (via quoted-books)

(via reprocessed)

Video

Sigur Ros - Glósóli

(Source: youtube.com)

Link

letstalkaboutrape:

That’s awesome! It’s an honor to hear from someone who has done such important work and I’m so glad this small but mighty list is meaningful to you. Is your forum still up and running? Can we add it to the list? Thanks so much for commenting <3

It closed in 2000; I was a kid in over my head (I’d started it, and needed it, for myself more than anything) and could never do what these others do.  But thank you so much for the kind words, and more importantly for all the work you and other advocates keep doing.